Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Guest post: Response to the discussion on Red List assessments of East African chameleons

AHjardingThis is guest post by Angelique Hjarding in response to discussion on this blog about the paper below.
Hjarding, A., Tolley, K. A., & Burgess, N. D. (2014, July 10). Red List assessments of East African chameleons: a case study of why we need experts. Oryx. Cambridge University Press (CUP). doi:10.1017/s0030605313001427
Thank you for highlighting our recent publication and for the very interesting comments. We wanted to take the opportunity to address some of the issues brought up in both your review and from reader comments.

One of the most important issues that has been raised is the sharing of cleaned and vetted datasets. It has been suggested that the datasets used in our study be uploaded to a repository that can be cited and shared. This is possible for data that was downloaded from GBIF as they have already done the legwork to obtain data sharing agreements with the contributing organizations. So as long as credit is properly given to the source of the data, publicly sharing data accessed through GBIF should be acceptable. At the time the manuscript was submitted for publication, we were unaware of sites such as http://figshare.com where the data could be stored and shared with no additional cost to the contributor. The dataset used in the study that used GBIF data has now been made available in this way.
Angelique Hjarding. (2014). Endemic Chameleons of Kenya and Tanzania. Figshare. doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.1141858

It starts to get tricky with doing the same for the expert vetted data. This dataset consists primarily of data gather by the expert from museum records and published literature. So in this case it is not a question of why the expert doesn’t share. The question is why the museum data and any additional literature records are not on GBIF already. As has been pointed out in our analysis (and confirmed by Rod) most of these museums do not currently have data sharing agreements with GBIF. Therefore, the expert who compiled the data does not have the permission of the museums to share their data second hand. Bottom line, all of the data used in this study that was not accessed through GBIF is currently available from the sources directly. That is, for anyone who wants to take the time contact the museums for permission to use their data for research and to compile it. We also do not believe there is blame on museums that have not yet shared their data with forums such as GBIF. Mobilisation of data is an enormous task, and near impossible if funds and staff are not available. With regards to the particular comment regarding the lack of data sharing by NHML and other museums, we need to recognise what the task at hand would mean, and rather address ways such a monumental, and valuable, collection could be mobilised. A further issue should be raised around literature records that are not necessarily encapsulated in museum collections, but are buried in old and obscure manuscripts. To our knowledge, there is no way to mobilise those records either, because they are not attached to a specimen. Further, because there are no specimens, extreme care must be taken if such records were to be mobilised in order to ensure quality control. Again, assistance of expert knowledge would be highly beneficial, yet these things take time and require funds.

Another issue that was raised is why didn’t we go directly to GBIF to fix the records? The point of our research was not to clean and update GBIF/museum data but to evaluate the effect of expert vetting and museum data mobilization in an applied conservation setting. As it has been pointed out, the lead author was working at GBIF during the course of the research. An effort was made to provide a checklist of the updated taxonomy to GBIF at the time, but there was no GBIF mechanism for providing updates. This appears to still be the case. In addition, two GBIF staff provided comments on the paper and were acknowledged for their input. We are happy to provide an updated taxonomy to help improve the data quality, should some submission tool for updates be made available.

Finally we would like to address the question, why use GBIF data if we know it needs some work before it can be used? We believe this is a very important debate for at least two reasons. First, when data is made public, we believe there are many researchers who work under the assumption that the data is ready for use with minimal further work. We believe they assume that the taxonomy is up to date; that the records are in the right place; and that the records provided relate to the name that is attached to those records. Many of the papers that have used GBIF data have undertaken broad scale macroecological analyses where, perhaps, the errors we have shown matter little. But some of these synthetic studies have also proposed that their results can be used for decision making by companies, which starts to raise concerns especially if the company wants to know the exact species that its activities could impact. As we have shown, for chameleons at least, such advice would be hard to provide using the raw GBIF data.

Second, we are aware that there is another group of researchers using GBIF data who "know that to use GBIF's data you need to do a certain amount of previous work and run some tests, and if the data does not pass the tests, you don't use it." We are not sure of the tests that are run, and it would be useful to have these spelled out for broader debate and potentially the development of some agreed protocols for data cleaning for various uses.

Our underlying reason for writing the paper was not to enter into debate of which data are best between GBIF and an expert compiled dataset. We are extremely pleased that GBIF data exist, and are freely available for the use of all. This certainly has to be part of the future of 'better data for better decisions', but we are concerned that we should not just accept that the data is the best we can get, but should instead look for ways to improve it, for all kinds of purposes. As such, we would like to suggest that the discussion focuses some energy on ways to address the shortcomings of the present system, but also that the community who would benefit from the data address ways to assist the dataholders to mobilise their information in terms of accessing the resources required to digitise and make data available, and maintain updated taxonomy for their holdings. In an era of declining funding for Museum-based taxonomy in many parts of the world this is certainly a challenge that needs to be addressed.

We welcome further discussion as this is a very important topic, not only for conservation but also in terms of improved access to biodiversity knowledge, which is critical for many reasons.

Angelique Hjarding http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9279-4893
Krystal Tolley
Neil Burgess